Realtors

Where do we find the most up-to-date information on South Huntington Schools?


Dr. Bernardo, Superintendent of Schools, writes a weekly newsletter filled with important and timely information for the community. The newsletter is released every week and can be found on the Realtor page or by going to http://www.shufsd.org. In addition, our website is updated daily with the latest news and calendar information. Use the search feature on our website to find stories that are no longer active.

 

Great News To Share:

Hi All:

I hope you are having a wonderful week.  Below we have included some fantastic news about our high school’s academic standing.  The information, provided by U.S. News and World Report, speaks volumes about the true scholastic achievement of our district.  It is inspiring to know that South Huntington has been able to endure both the financial storms and political rancor that have often characterized public education in New York State.  The pride is strong in our learning community, and there are more wonderful things on the horizon. 

 

In addition, the latest version of the newsletter is available at friendsofshufsd.org and the newest Spotlight has been mailed to your offices.  Also, the district website shufsd.org is full of great stories that you might want to share. As always, please feel free to give us a call if we can help spread the good news about South Huntington Schools.

 

Be well,

Dave Bennardo

  

Each year U.S. News and World Report calculates the rankings of the nation’s best high schools.  The publisher partners with American Institute for Research (a prominent Washington, D.C. behavioral and social science research firm) to evaluate nearly 20,000 Grade 9-12 secondary schools in the nation.  The criteria has grown over the years from a simple look at AP offerings and placements to a fuller analysis, which includes students’ performance on mandated state assessments, AP offerings, AP exam success rate, minority and economically disadvantaged subgroup performance, and teacher-to-student ratio.

The tradition at this time of year is for school districts that made the list to celebrate the accomplishments, while the many who failed to earn recognition dismiss the statistics as meaningless.  Although some of the criticisms might have been justifiable in the past when AP course offerings served as one of the only indicators, the more robust criteria includes both state and AP exam performance, as well as subgroup success. 

It is exciting to note that Walt Whitman High School has been awarded a Silver Medal in this year’s rankings.  The rankings have us at the 18th spot of the 120 high schools on Long Island and 64/1,147 (+21 spots) in the state and 663/19,411 (+87 spots) in the nation.

 

According to U.S. News and World Report, Long Island's top 20 high schools are as follows:

 

1.         Jericho High School; Jericho

2.         Manhasset Secondary School; Manhasset

3.         William A. Shine Great Neck South High School; Great Neck

4.         Garden City High School; Garden City

5.         South Side High School, Rockville Centre

6.         Cold Spring Harbor High School; Cold Spring Harbor

7.         The Wheatley School; Old Westbury

8.         Syosset Senior High School; Syosset

9.         Herricks High School; New Hyde Park

10.       Harborfields High School; Greenlawn

11.       Paul D. Schreiber Senior High School; Port Washington

12.       Roslyn High School; Roslyn Heights

13.       Plainview-Old Bethpage John F. Kennedy High School; Plainview

14.       Half Hollow Hills High School West; Dix Hills

15.       Floral Park Memorial High School; Floral Park

16.       Locust Valley High School; Locust Valley

17.       Carle Place Middle/High School; Carle Place

18.       Walt Whitman High School; Huntington Station

19.       Babylon Junior Senior High School; Babylon

20.       Greenport High School; Greenport

 

The Formula 

1. The process starts with a determination if a school is performing better than statistically expected for the average student in the state. This starts with an examination of reading and math results for all students on each state's high school proficiency tests.

The percentage of economically disadvantaged students enrolled at the school is then factored to determine if they are performing better than statistical expectations.

2. For those schools that made it past this first step, the second step is to determine whether the school's least-advantaged and minority students – black, Hispanic and low-income – are performing better than average for similar students in the state.

3. Schools that make it through the first two steps become eligible to be judged nationally on the final step, which is college-readiness performance.  This step uses Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate test participation on a school-wide basis, as well as exam success data as the benchmarks for success