Tournament of Science Thrills Maplewood Students

Brain Mogul presenter Kate Hoover taught the audience about static electricity and then held a competition to move a metal ribbon ball across the stage and into the hoop.
Brain Mogul presenter Kate Hoover taught the audience about static electricity and then held a competition to move a metal ribbon ball across the stage and into the hoop.
Maplewood students were very excited to receive one of the coveted tickets that enabled them to compete on stage.
Maplewood students were very excited to receive one of the coveted tickets that enabled them to compete on stage.
Who can make the longest worm using chemistry? The students were amazed and had a great time.
Who can make the longest worm using chemistry? The students were amazed and had a great time.
To explain how gasses work, this experiment turned a colorful liquid clear by blowing carbon dioxide bubbles into the beaker. Carbon dioxide is exhaled in the breath of humans and land animals. The winner turned their liquid clear the fastest.
To explain how gasses work, this experiment turned a colorful liquid clear by blowing carbon dioxide bubbles into the beaker. Carbon dioxide is exhaled in the breath of humans and land animals. The winner turned their liquid clear the fastest.
To understand how florescence works, students used a laser light pen to write a message that glowed in the dark.
To understand how florescence works, students used a laser light pen to write a message that glowed in the dark.
Using laws of motion, this experiment, when done properly, landed an egg perfectly in a glass. This Maplewood student listened carefully to instructions, and as you can see, almost found its target.
Using laws of motion, this experiment, when done properly, landed an egg perfectly in a glass. This Maplewood student listened carefully to instructions, and as you can see, almost found its target.
Flight has always been fascinating, and in this experiment, students attempt to land their plane on their handheld runway. It was easier said than done!
Flight has always been fascinating, and in this experiment, students attempt to land their plane on their handheld runway. It was easier said than done!

Brain Mogul’s Tournament of Science, held recently at Maplewood Intermediate School, is a one-of-a-kind science competition with upbeat music, an energetic scientist named Kate, and a powerful educational message. The show involved 18 student volunteers competing in a series of science experiments.

As if the competition wasn't enough, Maplewood students were fascinated by the science challenges, ranging from levitating a metal object across the stage to score through a hoop (static electricity), to turning a liquid into worms using chemistry (polymers). Each experiment required concentration, agility, dexterity, speed, and, of course, science knowledge!

This fast-paced show helped to introduce students to the wonders of science in a unique way and aimed to leave a lasting impression. “I want Maplewood students to have fun with science,” said Kate Hoover, Brain Mogul Science presenter. “Getting enthusiastic about science, especially when it’s easy to understand, makes students want to learn more.” Brain Mogul’s Tournament of Science aims to encourage students' curiosity at a critical age and allow science to come alive in a different way from what is possible with textbooks. And come alive it did. Students participated in fun experiments while their classmates cheered them on. Thank you, PTA Cultural Arts, for this really fun and unforgettable science experience.