Stimson Wetlands Mural Ready for Debut

Stimson Art teacher Ms. Danielle Rescigno, left, and Principal Ms. Faye Robins,  proudly show off the work of their students. The mural, to be mounted to a wall  in the Stimson Library, combine artistic creativity and knowledge of wetland inhabitants and the ecosystem of Long Island.
Stimson Art teacher Ms. Danielle Rescigno, left, and Principal Ms. Faye Robins, proudly show off the work of their students. The mural, to be mounted to a wall in the Stimson Library, combine artistic creativity and knowledge of wetland inhabitants and the ecosystem of Long Island.
Long Island. The name alone says "wetlands," and educating our students about the importance of the wetlands is crucial. While Long Island has been spared of late from any really major ecological disasters, Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico have underscored the importance of the wetlands, and they cannot be taken for granted. The need to value and protect them is more paramount than ever.  

We have highlighted many of the educational opportunities that our students enjoy, starting at the district's primary schools and continuing through to high school. Paumanok, located just behind Walt Whitman High School, will be a 14-acre wetland outdoor lab where students can get an up-close, first-hand experience of a unique wetland that has all but disappeared from Long Island. 

Last year, 26 eighth-grade students in Ms. Danielle Rescigno’s art classes at Stimson Middle School created a mural that gives them a better understanding of how wetlands and costal ecosystems work. “This is a hands-on educational experience," said Ms. Rescigno. "By creating a realistic depiction of the wetlands, we will have combined our artistic creativity and knowledge with a cocurricular study of the inhabitants and ecosystem of this area. Wetlands are a critically important ecological community of fragile beauty. Less than half of the wetlands in the United States still exist. More than one third of the nation's endangered species depend upon wetlands for survival.” 

The mural will be mounted on a wall in the Stimson Library for all to enjoy. “This beautiful depiction of an endangered part of our planet will bring an awareness of the beauty and importance of this environment to all new generations who visit our library,” said Ms. Rescigno. 

The following students, now Whitman Freshman, have left a legacy to all those who follow them at Stimson: Nicole Cambria, Victor Chae, Shahzel Ehsan, Ahmad Ejaz, Theodore Fisher, Alexandra Greaves, Mohammed Jalili, Destinee James, Marina Kilkenny, Matthew Kleet, Joselin Lopez-Fuentes, Carol Melhado, Ellysandra Monegro, Jason Moreira, Nicole Naughton, Anali Nanavati, Michelle Nardelli, Kayla Neiland, Cynthia Nunez, Christina O'Donnell, Rose Pedretti, Ricardo Portillo, Julianna Richter, Nicole Samba, Julizza Vivas, and Olivia Zakarin.