National Day on Writing @ Stimson

The six-word memoir proved a tough challenge for students in Mr. Karcz’s English class.
The six-word memoir proved a tough challenge for students in Mr. Karcz’s English class.
A pep talk from the Kid President in Ms. Chapman’s classes posed the question “What if Michael Jordan quit when he got cut from his high school basketball team?”
A pep talk from the Kid President in Ms. Chapman’s classes posed the question “What if Michael Jordan quit when he got cut from his high school basketball team?”
"What Would Happen Next" if these two characters met? Can only be answered in Ms. Braun’s English Class.
Figurative language exercises are used in Mr. Morris’s classes.
Figurative language exercises are used in Mr. Morris’s classes.
Students in Mr. Kazandjian’s English classes are hard at work.
Students in Mr. Kazandjian’s English classes are hard at work.
"No man is an island." Led to a spirited conversation in Ms. Smith’s classes.

We’re hearing from Stimson’s English Department Chairperson Ms. Joann Hili-Carbone that teachers and students at Stimson spent this past Monday, October 20th, celebrating a National Day on Writing.

In light of the significance of writing in our national life, to draw attention to the remarkable variety of writing we engage in, and to help writers from all walks of life recognize how important writing is to their lives, the National Council of Teacher of English (NCTE) established October 20 as The National Day on Writing.

“I am having my annual Character Ball,” said Ms. Braun, an English teacher at Stimson.  “Students come in dressed as the main character from the project book they are reading.”  The students had a ball and after a short period of socializing at a "Character Ball," students move into partner-pairs to create "What Would Happen Next" if these 2 characters met?  Students apply knowledge of characterization, setting, conflict, and theme to create this extension activity.

In Mr. Morris’s seventh-grade English classes, students had to pick a place in the community that is important to them and describe it and its importance using figurative language.  Students were then asked to bring in a photo, drawing, menu, etc... from the specified place. This actually lead into The Misfits (the Candy Kitchen hangout of the misfits) reading.

In Mr. Kazandjian’s English classes, students took the phrase: "If Only They Knew" as a theme and explored writing about what that meant to them.

Mr. Visslailli took a slightly different approach for his ESL classes.  “We're writing letters to Congressman Steve Israel and asking him to push for a formal program which allows military veterans to adopt the military dogs they work with in the field, said Mr. Visslailli. “This [idea] is from an article we read on the subject.”

"No man is an island" A quote like that can conger up all kinds of questions and discussions, so students in Ms. Smith’s classes discussed the quote, and from there the conversations let to a discussion about the words: community, unique, contribute, and values.  Then, the students answered a series of short response questions based on their discussion.

Students in Ms. Chapman’s classes got right into action by writing mission statements, with action plans of course, about how they can help to support their community at the grass roots level.  Her honors classes got to post their mission statements on Edmodo. A big part of Ms. Chapman’s “Do Now” for all classes, had her students writing about how "writing is an art to be mastered."

Mr. Karcz had his 7th and 8th grade English classes stretch their minds and create a memoir in only six words.  The six-word memoir proved a tough challenge as student researched words with greater meaning.

A National Day on Writing was a busy and successful day at Stimson as students learned, outside-of-the-box, many fun examples of the significance of writing in their lives.