A Deeper Understanding Comes To Life

Silas Wood teacher Michelle Anglisano works with a student who is choosing a painting from the Chauvet Cave to recreate.
Silas Wood teacher Michelle Anglisano works with a student who is choosing a painting from the Chauvet Cave to recreate.
By blowing the paint through a straw, student’s hands create a stencil, similar to what the cave people in Southern France created.
By blowing the paint through a straw, student’s hands create a stencil, similar to what the cave people in Southern France created.
The O’Dell Module units lay out an inquiry process using the latest technology mixed with a hands-on experience that gives our students a deeper understanding of the subject matter.
The O’Dell Module units lay out an inquiry process using the latest technology mixed with a hands-on experience that gives our students a deeper understanding of the subject matter.
Working in small teams, students share ideas as they experience creating their own pre-historic art.
Working in small teams, students share ideas as they experience creating their own pre-historic art.

Michelle Anglisano’s 6th grade classes have started studying pre-historic art using the O'Dell Module. The O’Dell Module units lay out an inquiry process through which students learn how to deepen their understanding of topics.

“Our students have been observing the beautiful cave art from the Chauvet Cave, located in southern France,” said Ms. Anglisano.  “The students are also reading an article titled; Hands Across Time.  This article discusses hand stencil art, so we wanted the classes to have the opportunity to get a tactile and kinesthetic experience by creating their own pre-historic art.”

Two of Ms. Anglisano’s classes made their own paint by grinding colored chalk into a fine powder and added a little water. By blowing the paint through a straw, they shot the paint, while aiming it at the outside of their hand, onto a crumpled up piece of a brown paper bag. Their hands were placed on the paper bag creating a stencil. This entire process was similar to what the cave people did as their prehistoric hand stencil art.

Another one of Ms. Anglisano’s classes created a different version of the art found in the Chauvet Cave. These students used chalk and charcoal as their medium. The students, working in small groups or individually, chose their favorite picture from the cave paintings and then copied their own rendition of what they saw. The chosen cave painting the students were recreating, was drawn on a piece of paper with a sandy surface.

“Our students' work will be displayed as part of our classroom door which is going to be transformed into a Prehistoric cave entrance very soon,” said Ms. Anglisano “Thank you to all the assistant teachers and my student teacher for the awesome help they gave our students.”