Art Takes Students Deeper

“It seems natural to give them a deeper understanding of what they are learning by supporting it with art.
“It seems natural to give them a deeper understanding of what they are learning by supporting it with art." - Ms. Marybeth Hickey
In writing hieroglyphics you can distinguish the direction in which the text is to be read because the human or animal figures always face towards the beginning of the line.
In writing hieroglyphics you can distinguish the direction in which the text is to be read because the human or animal figures always face towards the beginning of the line.
The term,
The term, "cartouche" is a relatively modern one coined by the soldiers of Napoleon's expedition in Egypt, who saw in the sign the likeness of the cartridges, or "cartouche" used in their own guns.

Silas Wood art teacher Ms. Marybeth Hickey has been coordinating what her students are learning in their regular classroom with what she is teaching in her art classes. “The students have been learning about ancient Egypt in their social studies classes, so to help support and deepen their understanding of that ancient culture, we have been creating art projects that support what they are learning.” 

Students set about learning hieroglyphics and creating an Egyptian cartouche, which is a name necklace worn by the pharos in ancient Egypt. “By learning about and creating these pieces, students are receiving a deeper understanding of what they are learning in the classroom,” said Ms. Hickey, who has been teaching art at Silas Wood for over 16 years and has always supported the academic side of education with the creative and artistic side. With the advent of incorporating art into the highly STEM-infused curriculum, Ms. Hickey’s efforts are even more in the forefront than before. STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, art, and math and is at the forefront of an educational effort aimed at attracting more youngsters to where the jobs are, both now and in the future. “Art is history," said Ms. Hickey, "so when students here are studying ancient Rome and Greece, it seems natural to give them a deeper understanding of what they are learning by supporting it with art."